Home School Days.

Special Days for Home Schoolers

If you are a home schooler and would like to visit the Abrams Planetarium, here are some dates and times we've scheduled for you to visit. Of course you can still call and reserve any other show times, but these special homeschool dates are open to anyone. No reservation needed and no minimum group size charge.

We've set aside the third Thursday of the month for the 2017/2018 school year. (Please note that in April, instead of the regular third Thursday, there will be two presentations, one on the first Thursday to go with MSU Science Festival, and another on the fourth Thursday.) Tickets will be sold at the gift counter starting at 1:00 p.m. Showtimes are at 1:30 p.m. There will be no late seating. Tickets are $2.00 per person.

October 19, 2017

Follow Mike Brown and his team at CalTech as they uncover dwarf worlds like the remarkably bright Eris; Haumea, an egg-shaped object rotating incredibly fast; and Sedna, whose orbit takes it deep into the far reaches of the Solar System. Is there a new planet beyond these distant objects? We'll tag along on Mike Brown's first night searching for the ninth planet at the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii. Join us on the hunt!

November 16, 2017

Join children's entertainer Fred Penner as he explores things large and small, from the colors of the rainbow, to the reasons for the seasons. Through the use of entertaining songs and immersive environments, children are encouraged to participate while learning about the planets, constellations, meteors, the moon and more.

December 21, 2017

Santa Claus is missing! Mrs. Claus is worried and asks Oatmeal the snowman to help find him. Join Oatmeal and his friend George, the planetarium wizard, as they travel the world in search of Santa. Along the way they are told constellation stories from many cultures and how to use the stars of the Big Dipper to find north. This holiday show is particularly appropriate for young children and their families.

April 5, 2018

Deep in the ice at the heart of Antarctica, IceCube, the biggest and strangest detector in the world waits for mysterious messengers from the cosmos. Scientists are using tiny and elusive particles called neutrinos to explore the most extreme places in the universe. These ghostly neutrinos give us an exclusive way to study powerful cosmic engines like exploding stars and black holes. In this show, stunning simulations of the most energetic places in our universe, and the galaxies around us, are the prelude to a thrilling journey inside IceCube, looking for traces of neutrino collisions in the ice. From one of the most remote locations on Earth to the unexplored regions of the cosmos, this show will take you on a journey you won't forget.

April 26, 2018

An overview of how the day and night sky change through the year. Students will predict and observe how the sun's path changes over the year and learn how that relates to changing seasons. They will learn why we see different constellations through the year by looking from an earth and space-based perspective.


Parking

Parking can be difficult on the MSU campus on weekdays. There are metered spaces in the parking ramp behind the planetarium, but they tend to fill up early. There is no parking in the lot in front of the planetarium. That lot is for faculty and staff only. We have 6 spaces by the curb in front of the planetarium. We will give passes for those spaces on a first come basis. Click here for more parking information: DPPS parking information.


Adult Supervision

This is not a drop-off program. All students must be accompanied by an adult and supervised at all times. Parents and chaperones also must buy a ticket for $2.00. Children under two years of age will be admitted at no cost, but we strongly suggest children under two years of age stay home. If a child becomes noisy and disruptive, we may ask that you leave the planetarium theater.


Recommended Ages

The recommended grades given for the above shows are our recommendations based on the show's content. However, students of all ages will be permitted to any of the shows.


Click here for information about the MSU observatory public observing dates. The MSU observatory houses a 24" telescope used for astronomical research. One weekend a month, the telescope is set up for use by the public. Smaller telescopes are set up in the parking lot in front of the observatory. The telescopes will be looking at the Moon, planets and other celestial sights. The dates are typically the weekend closest to the First Quarter Moon

Click here for information about the MSU Astronomy Department lecture series. Once a month, an Astronomy Department faculty member gives a public talk about their current research. The lectures are geared towards general audiences. The lectures are free. Talks start at 7:30 p.m. and usually last about an hour.